Goodbye From Our Seniors: A Healthy Attitude is Key to Success

May 4, 2016

Culture, News

16As seniors begin wrapping up their last few days as ASK Scholars, we asked a few of them to leave some parting words of wisdom for the underclassmen. First up, is senior Devon Blanchard.

Read Sadina Tarbox’s letter here.

Read Nicholas Newton’s letter here.

Read Johanna Poirier’s letter here.

Read Marilyn Cope’s letter here.

Read Cole Feltman’s letter here.

Read Quinton Valencia’s letter here.

Dear Tiny Babies of ASK,

Don’t think your first two years of high school aren’t important. You can’t change those grades once they’re done, and you’ll be struggling in your senior year to get that GPA up. Get the best grades you can and try your hardest, you’ll thank yourself later.

Something not a lot of people will tell you is that school isn’t for everyone. This doesn’t make you dumb or have less worth than anyone. But don’t slack off and not do any of your work and say “Oh well, school just isn’t for me,” because that means you didn’t try. You have to try your best now because it will pay off when you are ready to graduate from school.

Your grades don’t define who you are, either. It’s okay to do the best of your ability and still get a low grade.

Your friends are just as important, too. Even if it’s just one person that you sit next to in class, or if they are all online, they matter as much as your schoolwork does. Don’t forget about them. It’s healthy to have social interactions with people and your friends are closer to you than anyone else. They’ll help you, and you’ll help them, because that’s what being a good friend is all about. Also remember, NO boy/girl/nonbinary person is worth leaving your friends for.

Experimenting is okay. It helps you find who you are, even if you’re just the same as before. Stay away from hard drugs though, it’s never ever worth it. You’ll end up broke and desperate and you turn into a horrible, selfish, greedy person. Learn your hobbies, your strengths and weaknesses, maybe even your gender/sexuality if you want. As long as you aren’t hurting anyone or yourself, don’t be ashamed of who you are. Love every weird flaw about you, because that’s a part of you, and that’s what makes you neato. Don’t discriminate against people, though, no one deserves to be judged for who they are or what they look like.

Overall, do the best you can. You’ll feel so proud and accomplished. Remember that someone else’s success doesn’t equal your failure, comparing yourself to other people will only make you feel worse. No one is the same. Your success is defined by you, not the expectations of others.

Don’t overwork yourself to the point you have a meltdown. Learn time management and self discipline. Your mental health comes above ALL else, no ifs, ands, or buts about it. Your health is critical to performing well in school. Find that balance of school/work/social life. It is hard though. High school is one of the most overwhelming phases of your life. You’re growing and changing as a person and trying to figure out who you are, but that’s okay! It’s temporary. Work through it, do your best, and you’ll get past it.

2016 ASK Catalyst Editor

Devon Blanchard

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Trackbacks/Pingbacks

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  5. Goodbye From Our Seniors: You Can’t Get the High School Experience Back | ASK Catalyst - May 10, 2016

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