Eggs Fly From Balcony in Lesson on Impact and Vibration

October 29, 2015

News

Photos by Paige Fairchild Sixth graders Isabella Chartier and Teya Schulte unwrap their egg drop packages to find a cracked egg in Mr. Grainger's Gateway to Engineering and Design class on Tuesday.

Photos by Paige Fairchild
Sixth graders Isabella Chartier and Teya Schulte unwrap their egg drop packages to find a cracked egg in Mr. Grainger’s Gateway to Engineering and Design class on Tuesday.

By Paige Fairchild —

Mr. Grainger’s first period class was chaotic on Tuesday morning, as middle school scholars  busted open boxes and pulled out their shattered eggs.

Sixth, seventh, and eighth graders in Grainger’s Gateway to Engineering and Design I class were assigned to build a contraption that would protect an egg from cracking. They could use any material they wanted – once the package was designed and bundled it was put to the test by being thrown, kicked, and dropped by other scholars and managers around campus.

Grainger said that all engineers need to learn how to package the highly sensitive material they are building, and the egg drop is a classic project that teaches kids to create a hypothesis and test their product. “I lot of my ideas come from online or my past experiments,” Grainger said. “I wanted to add a twist to the project and send it around school (before it was dropped from the stairwell) so that anybody could attempt to damage it.”

Sixth graders Isabella Chartier and Teya Schulte teamed up and created a tube that included nestling their egg in soaked sponges, then immersing the sponge in cotton and wrapping paper. At the bottom of the tube sat pennies, “to keep it heavy to land straight down instead of on its side.”

“I think that building it was the best part of the project because we got to make blue prints and combined our ideas from there,” Schulte said.

When they unwrapped their package to see if the egg had survived the vibration test after being thrown around all day at school, Schulte and Chartier were dismayed to see the egg had cracked, and it was back to the drawing board. They decided to rewrap their egg, this time in sponges that were slightly less damp, in hopes that it would hold up better during the drop test.

Another team of sixth graders, Mateo Gomez, Jace Arellin, and Evan Spell, put their brains together and came up with a contraption that passed every test. “We put the egg in a pair of socks with cotton balls, crumpled up graphing paper, and put bubble wrap inside,” Gomez said. “Most of the 8th graders even played soccer with it,” Arellin added. They said they were not surprised that their egg passed the vibration test.

Sixth grade scholars Mateo Gomez, Jace Arellin, and Evan Spell's design passed both the vibration and the impact test.

Sixth grade scholars Mateo Gomez, Jace Arellin, and Evan Spell’s design passed both the vibration and the impact test.

After the vibration test, scholars rewrapped their packages and headed to the top of the stairs on the North end of the building and dropped their egg to test it for impact.

This time, Chartier and Schulte’s package passed the test with flying colors.

egg drop 041

Chartier holds up her egg to show Mr. Grainger that it was still intact and had survived the two story drop.

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